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The Wayfinder Sunflower Project

This project was started in 2013 during the painting of the Internment Mural in Vernon, BC. The success of the campaign was huge, and hundreds of seeds were planted and many sunflower paintings were inspired. The poem included, by Georgianna Moore, was a part of this inspiration. This project could provide the impetus for further conversation about internment, the importance of cultural history, human rights and social responsibility.

 

The sunflower represents many aspects of the past, and the present, thus making the anniversary campaign about hope and a national temporary art challenge, that speaks to the resilience of all the people of this country. This symbol is about the immigrant journey of yesterday and today. The bravery of the people who sought change and used agricultural skills to create a new life, and these skills are extremely relevant during this pandemic. As we walk with giants, this larger than life golden trail will lead in an act of faith and connection, for a better future and symbolizes a new beginning from old roots. 

- Michelle Loughery, Master Artist and her award-winning Wayfinder Program.

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The Symbol of the SunflowerHost Artist Michelle Loughery
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The Wayfinder Project 

Michelle Loughery Wayfinder Programs are structured on employment skills and community engagement social skills, which are the number one missing link between skilled workers and the job market. Art trade based learning and partnerships will guide students directly into gaining essential skills and a bridge to jobs, further education or entrepreneurship. Part of this program also has students enrolled in, The, “Passport to Employment Program,” (created 2001) A Michelle Loughery Murals designed program that gives youth a life skill and employment sustainability plan to move forward to empower and sustain a healthy lifestyle.

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Leadership skills taught through the arts are what young people need most to be successful in life. Competition for jobs is fierce, and the current state of the world and economy require an ability to constantly adapt to change. Is the coming generation ready to face the realities of life after school? Education in the arts should not be reserved for the talented few, but promoted as the means for all children to develop skills in: creative thinking, confidence, problem-solving, accountability, relationship building, communication, adaptability and dreaming big.

Innovative service delivery models are needed in our schools to help at-risk youth, and to ameliorate family dysfunction so that children have an increased potential to learn. Our online learning offers connection to community-based agencies that provide prevention and intervention services. The mechanism of the safety of the wall and the sense of place in the community that is developed to form and implement these partnerships is youth driven and unique.

 

Unveiling of the Vernon Internment Mural 

 

 

 

Sunflower Mural Michelle Loughery Sunflo

Our Connected Story

The sunflower represents many aspects of the past, and the present, thus making the campaign about hope and a national temporary art challenge that speaks to the resilience of all people of this country. This symbol is about the indigenous and immigrant people of yesterday and today. The bravery of the people who sought change and used agricultural skills to create a new life, and these skills are extremely relevant during this pandemic and recovery As we walk with giants, this larger than life golden trail will lead in an act of faith and connection, for a better future and symbolizes a new beginning from old roots.

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Artist and The Sunflower Project Founder Loughery plants in honour of her Ukrainian family members that were interned in Canada’s WW1 Internment Operations. During this period, the federal government interned thousands of Ukrainians, Bulgarians, Croatians, Czechs, Germans, Hungarians, Italians, Jews, various peoples from the Ottoman Empire, Poles, Romanians, Russians, Serbians, Slovaks, and Slovenes, among others, most of them Ukrainians and most of them civilians.

 

The CFWWIRF official logo, designed by international muralist and internee descendant Michelle Loughery was used as the image for this stamp. The colours of the logo deliberately lack vibrancy to reflect the sombre nature of the internment operations. The image of the blue maple leaf and the snowflakes conveys the coldness of the internment camps that were located behind the barbed wire fence.

 

2020 - This year marks the commemoration of the 100 years of the end of
Canada’s First National Internment Operations, 1914 to 1920 

 June 20th 2020 marks the 100th year of the freedom.

 
The Sunflower Project Mural Artist Michelle Loughery The Camps Season 1

The Camps Season 1
Episode 2 of 17 - Vernon, BC

Armistice Films
 

Award Winning Master Muralist and Art Educator, Michelle Loughery speaks about the importance of Art in remembering history.

 
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The Surprising Story of Canada’s Enemy Aliens 
StoryHive

 

You’ll be amazed to hear about the internment of Canadian citizens during WWI and how it affected the Ukrainian community of Vernon, B.C.

 

Award Winning Master Muralist and Art Educator, Michelle Loughery The Sunflower Mural Project